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Short Courses

EuCAP 2009 Short Courses will be held on Monday, 23 March 2009, Tuesday, 24 March 2009, Wednesday, 25 March 2009 and Thursday, 26 March 2009. Courses are afternoon courses. There is an additional fee for Short Course registration.

Mon-SC1 Microwave/mmW Photonic Feed Architectures for Large Phased Arrays
Dilip Paul, ACES, 8006 Thornley Court, Bethesda, MD 20817, USA
This Short Course is cancelled
Hall C1

23 March 2009

14:00 - 18:00


Mon-SC2

High resolution radio propagation prediction techniques and planning of GSM and UMTS/HSDPA networks
Karim Rizk, Wavecall, Lausanne, Switzerland
This Short Course is cancelled

Hall C2

23 March 2009

14:00 - 18:00


Tue-SC3 UWB Antennas and Channel Characterization for Communication and Radar
Werner Wiesbeck, Universität Karlsruhe, Germany
Hall C1

24 March 2009

14:00 - 18:00


Tue-SC4 Dielectric Resonator Antennas, Theory, Design and Applications with the Latest Developments
Ahmed A. Kishk, University of Mississippi
Hall C2

24 March 2009

14:00 - 18:00


Wed-SC5 Small Antenna Design for Mobile Handsets, UWB, Sensors, RFID tags and other Applications, and their Performance Enhancement by using EBGs and Metamaterials
Raj Mittra, Pennsylvania State University, Zhinong Ying, Sony Ericsson
Hall C1

25 March 2009

14:00 - 18:00


Thu-SC6 The Art and Science of Antenna Near-Field Measurements and Diagnostics: From Fundamentals to Recent Developments
Yahya Rahmat-Samii, University of California, Los Angeles
Hall C1

26 March 2009

14:00 - 18:00


Thu-SC7 Atmospheric attenuation on micro- and mm- waves
Ondrej Fiser,  Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Czech Academy of Science
This Short Course is cancelled
Hall C2

26 March 2009

14:00 - 18:00


If you require any further information please do not hesitate to contact the EuCAP 2009 Organisers at  vde-conferences@vde.com.

SC1 - Microwave/mmW Photonic Feed Architectures for Large Phased Arrays

23 March 2009, 14:00 - 18:00 (Hall C1)

Chair: Dilip Paul, ACES, 8006 Thornley Court, Bethesda, MD 20817, USA

Abstract: This half-day short course will discuss several novel antenna feed architectures that are deemed immensely suitable for large and/or space-based arrays constrained by a host of critical requirements. Often, these stringent specifications such as compactness, light-weight, and prime power efficiency of the beam forming network (BFN) with much sought after capability for steering, nulling, reconfiguring, frequency agility, etc. render conventional RF/MW/mmW technologies unattractive. Whereas, judicious optical implementations of various signal processing functions such as generation, transmission, up/down block conversion, and distribution of high dynamic range MW/mmW signals have demonstrated elegant solutions to such feeds.

 An overview of the innovative application of advanced photonics technology augmented by assessment of capability and market feasibility will be presented in this course. Relevant state-of-the-art optical technologies (fiber optics, laser optics, integrated optics, wavelength division multiplexer/demultiplexer (WDM), optical add-drop module (OADM), filters, optical amplifier, etc.), high speed optoelectronics (silicon photonics, optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEICs), analog-to-digital converter (ADC), modulator, demodulator, etc.), micro-opto-electro-mechanical (MOEM) switch matrix, and BFN subsystems and systems, including reliability and radiation hardness will be described in detail. Also, results of proof-of-concept demonstration and field deployment will be included. Recent advances in novelty nano-devices and technology bode well for all-optically implemented RF/MW/mmW systems.

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SC2 - High resolution radio propagation prediction techniques and planning of GSM and UMTS/HSDPA networks

23 March 2009, 14:00 - 18:00 (Hall C2)

Chair: Karim Rizk, Wavecall, Lausanne, Switzerland

Abstract: The complexity of wireless network design has led operators to adopt or explore new simulation techniques. Signal-strength prediction system lies at the foundation of every wireless network simulator. High resolution prediction in urban environments is one of the techniques being examined because classical models fall short of the required accuracy in dense urban environments where most traffic is situated.

Urban prediction requires that account be taken of various mechanisms of propagation. An overview of the most relevant mechanisms will be given :

-         Interaction with  terrain, in flat and hilly environments.

-         Interaction with vegetation,

-         Effect of transmitter height ranging from micro to macrocell

The impact of the prediction accuracy on the network cost and network performance then will be investigated through two GSM and UMTS case studies.

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SC3 - UWB Antennas and Channel Characterization for Communication and Radar

24 March 2009, 14:00 - 18:00 (Hall C1)

Chair: Werner Wiesbeck, Universität Karlsruhe, Germany

Abstract: Spectrum is presently one of the most valuable goods worldwide as the demand is permanently increasing and it can be traded only locally. Since the United States FCC has opened the spectrum from 3.1 GHz to 10.6 GHz, i.e. a bandwidth of 7.5 GHz, for unlicensed use with up to –41.25 dBm/MHz EIRP, numerous applications in communications and sensor areas are showing up. All these applications have in common that they spread the necessary energy over a wide frequency range in this unlicensed band in order to radiate below the limit. The results are ultra wideband systems. These new devices exhibit especially at the air interface, the antenna, quite surprising behaviors. This talk presents an insight into design, evaluation and measurement procedures for Ultra Wide Band (UWB-) antennas as well as into the characteristics of the UWB radio channel as a whole. UWB antenna basics and principles of wideband radiators, transient antenna characterization and UWB antenna quality measures, derived from the antenna impulse response, are topics. EM simulations and measurements of transient antenna properties in frequency domain and in time domain are included. Different antennas, based on different UWB principles, will be presented. Depending on the interest there are: ridged horn antenna, Vivaldi antenna, logarithmic periodic antenna, mono cone antenna, spiral antenna, aperture coupled bowtie antennas, multimode antennas, sinus antenna and impulse radiating antennas. The channel characterization comprises ray-tracing tools for deterministic indoor UWB channel modeling and measurements. The advantages and drawbacks of the UWB transmission will be discussed, depending on interest. The radiation from different antennas will be demonstrated by movies with a pulse excitation.

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SC4 - Dielectric Resonator Antennas, Theory, Design and Applications with the Latest Developments

24 March 2009, 14:00 - 18:00 (Hall C2)

Chair: Ahmed A. Kishk, University of Mississippi

Abstract: Recently, interest in dielectric resonator antennas has increased because of their attractive features such as small size, high radiation efficiency (98%), wide bandwidth, and high power capability for radar applications and base stations. The dielectric resonator antenna is made from high dielectric constant materials and mounted on a ground plane or on a grounded dielectric substrate of lower permittivity.

 The short course will start by an overview for the development of the dielectric resonator antennas. The theory of operation will be discussed step by step to provide basic understanding.  The discussion is provided in simple forms to satisfy audience of different background levels. Design curves will be provided for the circular disc and hemisphere dielectric resonators. Use of these models with other geometries is discussed. 

 Different excitation mechanisms are demonstrates such as the probe, slot, image line and waveguides. Applications of dielectric resonators in arrays are provided with discussion on the mutual coupling level and the wide scanning capabilities of the dielectric resonator antenna array. The array bandwidth limit is discussed based on the element size and the spacing between the array elements. 

 The problems related to the practical implementations are considered.  Results of a numerical study pertaining to the effect of an air gap, between the dielectric disc and the ground plane or an air gap surrounding the feed probe, on the input impedance and resonant frequency of a cylindrical DRA operating in the TM01ä mode or HEM11ä mode as a function of dielectric constant will be presented. Some of the numerical results are validated experimentally.

 Techniques for broadband applications are discussed.  Some of the techniques are based on the material properties and some depends on the DRA shape. Several examples are provided. Some elements would provide a matching bandwidth over 40% with reflection coefficients better than –10dB for 50 Ohms ports. Finally, Techniques for size reduction of the DRA are presented to demonstrate the flexibility of the DRA to satisfy the required small size for some applications.  The technique will result in small size and keeping wide bandwidth. The applications of the DRA for spatial power combiners are presented. The DRAs are placed in an oversized hard horn to provide uniform field distribution. Resent developments of the dielectric resonators as a multifunction device will be also provided.  In this application we will show the use of the same DR as an antenna with low quality factor and as a resonator with high Q-factor.

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SC5 - Small Antenna Design for Mobile Handsets, UWB, Sensors, RFID tags and other Applications, and their Performance Enhancement by using EBGs and Metamaterials

25 March 2009, 14:00 - 18:00 (Hall C1)

Chair: Raj Mittra, Pennsylvania State University, Zhinong Ying, Sony Ericsson

Abstract: Since the 1980's, the mobile industry has experienced a dramatic growth.  The first step was the transition from analog to digital standards. For instance, analog standards such as AMPS (Advanced Mobile Phone System), NMT (Nordic Mobile Telephone)  and ETACS were replaced  by digital ones, e.g., GSM, D-AMPS and CDMA.  The second step was the move to antennas from single to multiple frequency bands, owing to growing capacity requirements. For example, DCS (GSM 1800) and PCS (GSM1900), GSM850 were introduced since the middle of the 1990's. The third step was the development from voice to multimedia system, 3G systems such as WCDMA and their enhanced systems, introduced shortly after the beginning of the 21st century.  Furthermore, the WCDMA system has been proposed to be expanded to all cellular bands during the coming years. At the same time, an increasing number of non-cellular communication wireless standards have been introduced to the handset, such as FM radio, GPS, Bluetooth, WLAN, Wi-Fi, DVB-H RFID and UWB. The trend of future mobile handsets would be a need of more integrated antennas for cellular and non-cellular bands, diversity or MIMO applications. A combination of the problem of integration  and the demand of an attractive industry design in the mobile terminals, has made the practical antenna design work increasingly challenging.

This course will discuss some fundamentals of small antenna theory and the multi-frequency band antenna technologies for mobile handset; size reduction techniques; antenna integration techniques; antennas for GPS; multi-channel system; diversity, MIMO in the mobile terminals; human body effect; and, measurement techniques. Part 1 will deal with some fundamental issues of small terminal antennas; Part 2 will describe the progress of different multi-frequency band techniques for handset antennas; Part 3 will discuss the antenna integration issues and some practical engineering issues for the mobile terminal antennas; next, Part 4 will describe GPS, multi-channel antenna systems, diversity and MIMO; Part 5 will examine the use of metamaterials for handset antennas; and, finally in Part 6, the human body effect and some measurement techniques will be discussed.

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SC6 - The Art and Science of Antenna Near-Field Measurements and Diagnostics: From Fundamentals to Recent Developments

26 March 2009, 14:00 - 18:00 (Hall C1)

Chair: Yahya Rahmat-Samii, University of California, Los Angeles

Abstract: This short course will provide the participants with a novel way to understand the fundamental concepts behind modern antenna near field measurement and diagnostic techniques. Starting from basic electromagnetic principles, the underlying concepts governing simulations, designs and operations of planar near field measurements and diagnostics techniques will be reviewed. Modern measurement schemes such as plane-polar and bi-polar scanning will be highlighted. Advances in applying these techniques to millimeter-wave measurements will be reviewed. Representative measurement results of reflector and array antennas will be presented. The importance of near field diagnostic techniques will be discussed through some unique test cases.  Finally, the topic of phaseless measurement techniques and algorithms will be presented demonstrating the potential applications of these techniques in modern antenna measurements. The following topics will be presented: (a) Fundamental of EM concepts for antenna characterizations including antenna radiated fields, ideal dipole, solution of wave equations and special functions, (b) fundamentals of various near-field measurement techniques including equivalence theorem, spectral formulation and probe corrections, (c) Understanding antenna near-field diagnostic techniques including simulation models, back-projections, sampling theorems, (d) Case studies of several reflector and array antenna measurements and diagnostics, and (e) Phaseless measurements and recent advances including why phaseless measurements, phase retrieval algorithms and measured results.

SC7 - Atmospheric attenuation on micro- and mm- waves

26 March 2009, 14:00 - 18:00 (Hall C2)

Chair: Ondrej Fiser,  Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Czech Academy of Science

Abstract: The aim of this course is to show the physical principles of atmospheric attenuation of mm and cm waves aiming at the practical attenuation computation. The relation between physical properties of atmosphere (meteorological parameters) and radio wave attenuation is also scheduled in the programme. The most important phenomena, such as rain, cloud and water vapour will be emphasized. Course participants will be able to estimate the cumulative distribution of atmospheric attenuation as well as its instantaneous values on terrestrial (LOS) and satellite links for frequencies 10-100 GHz.

Content:

  1. Prediction (estimation) of atmospheric attenuation as a part of the radio-relay or satellite link planning, overview of attenuation effects based on physical reasons
  2. Rain attenuation
    • Important properties of rain drops and rain volume
    • Scattering of electromagnetic wave on a single rain drop (Rayleigh approximative scattering, Mie approximative scattering, exact scattering) and practical computations with respect to the frequency and temperature
    • Deduction of formula to compute specific attenuation and phase delay due to rain, approximative formulas according to the ITU-R
    • Short description of rain depolarisation
    • Overview of models (prediction methods) for cumulative distribution (CD) of rain attenuation on microwave and mm links (ITU-R model, Misme-Fimbel model and many others)
    • Details of rain attenuation estimation on satellite (slant) paths respecting the height profile of the atmosphere
    • Measurement and processing of rain rate aiming at attenuation prediction, analytical models of rain rate distribution
    • Focus on drop size distribution (DSD) and its importance in radio wave propagation, analytical models of DSD
    • Practical computation of rain attenuation, examples of results, annual statistics, worth month statistics, diurnal and seasonal variation
    • Verification of attenuation prediction methods
  3. Cloud attenuation
    • Physical structure of cloud, cloud droplet size distribution
    • Derivation of formulas computing instantaneous cloud attenuation
    • Engineering methods estimating cloud attenuation distribution, examples
    • Meteorological parameters necessary to predict cloud attenuation
  4. Water vapour attenuation
    • Formulas computing the specific water vapour attenuation
    • Practical methods estimating distribution of water vapour attenuation
    • Meteorological parameters to derive water vapour attenuation
  5. Combination of attenuation effects
  6. Site diversity – a powerful mitigation technique
  7. Summary

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